14 Resources for Citing Sources

Have you ever heard the saying that there is my truth, your truth, and somewhere in the middle, the real truth? Pinpointing the truth is the reason why I always find myself wanting to ask people to prove what they say. Let’s acknowledge this truth. We frequently don’t know if we can believe what we read. We always must question if we are reading, watching, or listening to a credible source.

Our students need to learn how to be their own fact-checkers and reject fake news. (Lesley Farmer wrote an informative post about it.) Being fact-checkers will enable our students to make informed decisions; whether these decisions relate to health issues, politics, or everyday consumer decisions. One way to help our students to be fact-checkers is to teach and require them to cite their sources. Perhaps they would be less inclined to accept incorrect information if they did.

There is no doubt that teaching students to cite information, regardless of their ages, can be difficult. Sometimes convincing adults to cite sources can be challenging. By the time students reach college, citing sources is a critical skill to practice. It can mean the difference between passing and failing a course.

Do we want our students to get “culture shock” when they start college? I want to argue that students need to start citing their sources in elementary school so that the skill becomes second nature. There is too much misinformation floating around today. Misinformation fuels misconceptions and hate.

Here are a few resources to help students learn how to cite sources properly. You can decide if the resource fits the skill level of your students. However, please, don’t assume that elementary students are not ready to cite sources. The skill is more important than ever. Students need to be mindful of where they are getting their information and how to support the statements that they make.

Use these resources to help you teach your students. Check these websites before using them to determine if they fit with your school policies. Some of them have ads.

Games

Tutorials

Citation Generators

November 2018 Professional Development

Organization Date & Time

Professional Development Title

ALCTS Webinars November 7, 2018- 1:00 -2:00 PM CST Intro to Data Visualization: Tools and Skills, Part 1
November 14, 2018- 1:00 – 2:00 PM CST Intro to Data Visualization: Tools and Skills, Part 2
Education Week November 1, 2018- 2:00 – 3:00 PM EST Trauma-Informed Schools: From Awareness to Action
edWeb.net November 1, 2018 – 2:00 – 3:00 PM EST Creative, Arts-Based STEM Learning in Early Childhood

 

November 7, 2018 – 4:00 – 5:00 PM EST Assessment and Student Agency

 

November 13, 2018 – 5:00 – 6:00 PM EST Using Your Smartphone for Teacher Help

 

 November 14, 2018 – 5:00 – 6:00 PM EST Collaboration Impacts Students’ Learning

 

TeachersFirst November 13, 2018- 6:00 – 8:00 PM CST

 

MakeCode: Bring Computational Thinking into Any Classroom

 

November 20, 2018- 6:00 – 7:30 PM CST

 

Creativity Cafe: Recipes for Formative Assessment

 

WebJunction November 5, 2018- 3:00 – 4:00 PM EST Small but Mighty Library Management and Innovation

 

November 29, 2018- 3:00 – 4:00 PM EST Librarian Evolution: Libraries Thrive When We Change

 

Booklist Webinars November 6, 2018- 1:00 – 2:00 PM CST Picture This! Books for the Youngest
November 20, 2018- 1:00 – 2:00 PM CST Out-of-This-World Youth Nonfiction

 

SLJ ISTE Webcast Series November 8, 2018- 3:00 – 4:00 PM EST Digital Citizenship for Tweens and Teens

Author: Daniella Smith

Daniella Smith, PhD. is a former school and public librarian. She is currently an associate professor at the University of North Texas.



Categories: Blog Topics, Professional Development, Student Engagement/ Teaching Models

Tags: , , , ,

2 replies

  1. Citation Maker is free and accurate and has no ads. There is an MLA and APA option for secondary students and MLA for elementary.

    https://elementary.oslis.org/cite-sources
    https://secondary.oslis.org/cite-sources

  2. Thank you for sharing!

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